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Astronomical question and answer 274

 

Frank L. Preuss

 

Can a galaxy be seen?

 

AndromedaGalaxy

"Our own galaxy, which we see on a clear night as the Milky Way, is just one of countless millions in the universe. Only a handful are visible to the naked eye, the nearest being two dwarf galaxies known as the Magellanic Clouds. The Large Magellanic Cloud lies in the constellations Dorada and Mensa, and the Small Magellanic Cloud lies in the constellation Tucana. The only other large galaxy visible to the naked eye is the Andromeda Galaxy, a spiral galaxy 2.4 million light years away. It can be seen in the constellation Andromeda as an elongated blur on a clear night. It is the most distant object visible to the naked eye."

 

 

This is the end of "Astronomical question and answer 274"
To the German version of this chapter: Astronomische Frage und Antwort 274

 

 

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